Articles Posted in 2008 Town and Country

THE DEFENDANT SHOULD BE ESTOPPED FORM ASSERTING THE ARBITRATION CLAUSE THIS LATE IN THE LITIGATION, ESPECIALLY SINCE THEY 1) FILED A COUNTERCLAIM IN BREACH OF THEIR OWN AGREEMENT; 2) MOVED TO HAVE JUDGMENT ENTERED ON THAT COUNTERCLAIM AGAIN BREACHING THEIR OWN AGREEMENT TO HAVE ALL DISPUTES BETWEEN THE PARTIES

The defendant should be prohibited for enforcing the arbitration agreement because of (1) the extent of the time which they took to enforce the arbitration agreement, and (2) the making of a counterclaim clearly breached the agreement between the parties. The defendants breached the agreement by making a counterclaim rather than demanding arbitration and as such cannot enforce the agreement. Not only have they made a counterclaim but they have moved to enter a judgment on those pleadings.

It is black letter contract law that a material breach by either party to a bilateral contract excuses the other party from rendering any further contractual performance. Magnet Res., Inc. v. Summit MRI, Inc., 318 N.J. Super. 275, 285, 723 A.2d 976, 981 (App.Div. 1998). The court should hold that the defendants have waived their right to assert the matter should be arbitrated. The Supreme Court addressed the issue of waiver in Wein v. Morris, 194 N.J. 364, 376 (2008) and held the following:

Originally, I filed a law suit against the new Chrysler Corporation with regard to a vehicle which was purchased by a current client of mine. The client experienced numerous issues with this vehicle including transmission, brakes and electrical problems. My client is alleging that there were numerous repairs on the breaks during the first 34,000 miles. Specifically, my client had to get authorization and claim number from Chrysler before any repairs would be done. We have been doing research on the internet and are attempting to discern the nature and extent of numerous prior problems by any 2008 Town & Country owners.

If you are a Town & Country owner, 2008, and have any complaints, communications with the manufacturer, communications with the selling dealer or other e-mail communications, please contact this law firm so that we might discuss obtaining this information from you.

Under New Jersey law, for a Lemon Law claim, the plaintiff is obligated to prove under certain circumstances that the use, value and safety of a vehicle have been substantially impaired. The claims in this case revolve around defective brakes, defective transmission and a defective electrical system, and the plaintiff is alleging that the use, value and safety have been substantially impaired.